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If you or a loved one were a victim of the recent

Train Accident you need legal help NOW.

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L.A. TRAIN CRASH KILLS 25; HUMAN ERROR BLAMED

At least 25 people were killed and 135 injured in the head-on crash of a commuter train and a freight train near Los Angeles that officials on Saturday attributed to the failure of the passenger train engineer to stop at a red light.

Federal investigators seeking an explanation for the deadliest U.S. train crash in almost 15 years. 

National Transportation Safety Board member Kitty Higgins said at a news conference Sunday night that preliminary investigation suggests the Metrolink train ran through a red signal Friday. The train filled with homebound commuters collided with a Union Pacific freight train on the same track.

Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said the death toll might go higher if people succumb to their injuries at any of the dozen or so hospitals where roughly 47 people remain in critical condition.
Light rail train hits bus in LA; at least 13 hurt
9/19/2008

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A light rail train slammed into a bus near downtown during Friday morning's commute, injuring at least 13 people, fire officials said.

The Metro Blue Line train was headed to Long Beach carrying passengers while the bus was out of service. As many as two dozen people were hurt, but none of the injuries appeared to be life-threatening, Fire Department spokesman Brian Humphrey said.

The impact knocked the front car of the electric train off the track. The other cars remained on the track. Littman said they were investigating the incident.
Associated Press writers Noaki Schwartz and Jeff Wilson contributed to this report.

Over the last three decades, the Safety Board has investigated a long list of accidents in which crewmembers failed to operate their trains effectively and in accordance with operating rules for a variety of reasons, including fatigue, sleeping disorders, use of medications, or distractions within the operating cab.  Because of these human performance deficiencies, the Board has advocated the implementation of a system that compensates for human error and that incorporates collision avoidance to prevent train collisions.  The Board believes that this system, known in the industry as positive train control (PTC), is particularly important in places where passenger trains and freight trains both operate.  Because of the Board’s longstanding interest in this issue, the area has remained on the Board’s Most Wanted List since the inception of the list in 1990.  This safety issue was highlighted when a freight train and a commuter train collided head-on in Placentia, California, in 2002.  As a result of that accident, the Board reiterated the need for PTC systems, particularly on high-risk corridors where commuter and intercity passenger railroads operate.
(from the NTSB website)